Butterflies and Other Lies

EdithCheckerspot

The American Association for the Advancement of Science used to promote science. I was a member for many years, and watched them devolve into an increasingly political leftist advocacy group. Nowhere is this process more evident than on the topic of climate change: The once-august group is willing to lie to promote the idea of catastrophic global warming, which keeps the grant money coming, keeps them on politically correct, and keeps them in good favor in the current government. As the evidence shows that climate change is not catastrophic and not likely to be, the AAAS and other advocacy groups are ramping up the lies, desperate to keep the scam going by mere dint of repetition. [...]

The Climate of Dinosaur Science

I have not yet grown out of my “dinosaur phase,” though I must confess that this transition point seems overdue. I’m happy with the current status, at least. But my interest in dinosaur science, like my interest in climate science, goes back several decades. During those decades, I’ve largely made a living in the software/technology [...]

Chicken of Turkey

A brief note on a telling dichotomy:

When the left describes something they don’t like about Christianity or Judaism, they are not shy about it. They’ll even pin bombings or shootings on “Christian terrorists” or “Tea party” people ( which to many on the left seems synonymous), before any evidence is in hand at all. [...]

Soft storage

dna-double-helix-marc-phares

This article caught my attention, and combines my interests in bioscience, computer science, and Shakespeare: [...]

California Prop 37: GMOs

California has a proposition on the ballot that hopes to affect food costs for the entire country. Proposition 37 would require new labeling for certain foods that involve genetically modified organisms, or GMOs. [...]

High Voice

I was asked yesterday about the “surly bonds of Earth” reference in the post about Neil Armstrong’s death. There is indeed a story behind that and a very unusual young man.

John Gillespie McGee Jr. was born in Shanghai to a US ambassador, thus was American. His initial school was in Shanghai, “The American School” [...]

Cantaloupe Crisis: One-Third of Michigan Gone

Once again, cantaloupes are causing a meloncholy feeling at the CDC, which used to be called the “Center for Disease Control.” (It got pluralized, and various tweaks were made because “control” was considered too late. It wound up as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which of course abbreviates to CDC.) [...]

The Cats Trying to Kill Curiosity

I was delighted, as were millions, by the successful touchdown of the Curiosity rover on the surface of Mars. It was a monumental achievement, of equipment working right (thanks to tremendous engineering and science) despite nearly a year’s exposure to extraordinary conditions and extremes in rapid succession. But as Sam Rayburn (48th, 50th, and 52nd Speaker of the House) notes, “Any jackass can kick down a barn. It takes a real carpenter to build one.” We’ve seen NASA in the role of “real carpenters” here. Who’s the “jackass”? [...]

Mars the Record of Nuclear Power

Tonight — 10:31 Pacific Time Sunday, or 1:31 AM Eastern on Monday — the Curiosity rover will hopefully touch down safely on the surface of Mars. The events actually take place about 14 minutes in advance, but we cannot know the results until the radio communications get from Mars to Earth. The vehicle is big. While the two famous rovers Opportunity and Spirit were roughly grocery-cart sized, this one is more like an automobile. It has tremendously greater science capability — and it is too big, and needs too much power, to operate from solar panels. So it does not: Curiosity is nuclear-powered. [...]

Science Saturday: Building a jellyfish

In this case, the jellyfish was not built from scratch. They took the cells from a rat heart and equipped a silicone shell with them, set up in a protein structure in the manner of a jellyfish. This construct actually swims! [...]