The “Happy” in “Happy Independence Day”


The commentary is from a year ago, and the poem was written so long ago that we were still flying Space Shuttles. But the feeling is quite sincere, and I’ve had much reason to put the skill discussed below to use. – – – – – – – – – – – – – – […]



More from the conversation with “THE RIPENING WANDERER” on the “only a few” defense of Islam. He wrote: […]



From here.

@silenceofmind, who wrote:

How do you propose to repair the moral fiber of a people who engage in or allow a genocide of 56,000,000?

I completely agree that late-term abortions are horrific things, and inhuman treatment of baby humans. But I don’t equate this with the mass slaughters carried out by the Nazis […]

Thomas Jefferson, Progressive


Thomas Jefferson is considered to be one of the leading Founding Fathers of the United States. Not one of the Framers, however — he was in France during the Philadelphia convention in which the Constitution was drafted, and other than some correspondence with James Madison had no role in its creation or ratification. At the end of his life, 40 years after the creation of the Constitution, Jefferson was asked to lend his hand in a political campaign. In this excerpt from a letter to Samuel Kercheval, Jefferson discusses his belief that the Constitution should be re-drafted “every nineteen or twenty years” in order to “keep pace with the times” and provide “progressive accommodation to progressive improvements” to society… […]



From a discussion on Citizen Tom’s blog on the forms of government, I wrote a bit on of how the US Constitution was inspired and framed: There are conceptual hints in Scripture and remarks by Jesus on what forms of government are disfavored, but the Framers took inspiration from Aristotle. Many Enlightenment thinkers tended to downplay Aristotle, though the re-discovery of his works is one of the factors leading to the Enlightenment. But many of the Framers read Aristotle directly as well as earlier writers he inspired including Locke and de Montesquieu… […]



“Life in these United States,” an old Readers Digest humor feature, had many amusing stories. Like this one:

The teacher in one of our local grade schools was showing a copy of the Declaration of Independence to her pupils. It passed from desk to desk and finally to Luigi, a first-generation American. The boy studied […]

Thanksgiving 2015


To all my friends here, old and new: The best Thanksgiving Day to you! Perhaps you’ll join the great repast And then, recovering, will fast… […]

America the Disdained


This article in Salon yesterday was one of several that I saw filled with disdain for America, its people, and its history. But the writer (Andrew O’Hehir) did seem to have some semi-affectionate humor for Fourth of July picnic foods. Interestingly, the author describes a common error in looking at history, then proceeds to write an entire article filled to brim with it. I’ve grouped some phrases from the article into categories. They are no longer in the original order as a result (although the order within categories is preserved. I’ll start with the author’s description of his own error: […]

Happy Independence Day

I hope that each and every one of you is having a happy Fourth of July. The “happy” part of that is significant, and I sincerely hope that you have the skill and the circumstances to achieve it. Skill? Yes. Thomas Jefferson, the primary author of the Declaration of Independence, wrote one of the most oft-quoted lines in history describing unalienable rights including life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Someone suggested to me today that: […]

John Adams


A mention of John Adams on Citizen Tom’s forum got me thinking a bit about history.